Currents

  • Corridor

    Corridor

    Junior

    With “Junior” (out 10/18!), Montreal’s Corridor make the most dazzling, immediate and inventive album of their young career: 39 minutes of darting and dodging guitars, spiraling vocal harmonies, and the complicated, goldenrod nostalgia of a Sunday mid-afternoon. The album was produced by Emmanuel Éthier, engineered by Samuel Gemme, mixed by Éthier and Gemme in Montreal at ReelRoad Studios, and mastered by Josh Bonati at Bonati Mastering in New York.

     

    You can now watch the new Monty Python-esque animated video for first single “Topographe”, which stars the band themselves. Corridor’s Jonathan Robert directed the visual, and had this to say, “While I’ve explored and mixed many different techniques in my past music videos, it’s the first time that I took the process this far, blending all of them together in one place. It’s a melting pot of stop motion, green screen, illustration, animation, collage, and live video. It’s the visual equivalent of the progression of the song, a simple idea that takes amplitude through repetition.”

     

    Singers, two guitars, bass, drums: the timelessness of the setup underpins the timelessness of the sound, a rock’n’roll borrowing from each of the past six decades—punk and pop, psych and jangle, daydream and swoon.

     

    Sub Pop have never before, in their 33-year history, signed a Francophone act. Maybe the Carridor‘s magic springs from their ingenious hooks, their topaz-tinted vision. Maybe it’s the panache of Québec’s insurgent underground scene, or the camaraderie of Robert and Berthiaume, who have played together since they were 14. Maybe it’s their name—a hallway crossed with a toreador. Probably it’s all of these, and none of them: “Junior” is a joy, a hasty miracle, because it’s so much damn fun to listen to. This album is 39 minutes; each day has 24 hours; you can listen 36 times before tomorrow.

    Listen: Corridor – “Topographe”

    Corridor – “Topographe”

  • Kae Astra

    Kae Astra

    Fortune

    Kae Astra is an Armenian-American artist currently based in Austin, TX, intertwining 80’s nostalgia, haunting melodies, and a lush dream pop soundscape on her debut EP “Fortune” (out 11/1). The upcoming release is a collaboration between Astra and fellow Austin mainstays Walker Lukens and Curtis Roush (of Bright Light Social Hour) who produced the EP.

     

    “’Medicate’ is my wrestling with the strange notion that we can be suddenly ‘fixed’ by one thing, be that a drug, a job, an achievement, etc. As a person, I’ve struggled with depression, anxiety, and other difficult mental states—as have many of my friends and idols. Sadly, we are made to feel bad for going through these struggles, which generally just makes it worse…and makes us desperately search for ways to ‘fix’ it.”—Kae Astra

     

    Kae Astra melds her history of music making with a newfound effervescent energy as frontwoman and lead songwriter for this project. The upcoming “Fortune” EP stirs listeners, emotionally and physically. The songs go deep spiritually and are undeniably danceable. You could hear them in the club, a yoga class, or while having a good cry—and be equally satisfied.

     

    Astra says the overarching theme is “resilience”, mirroring both her personal journey and continued artistic pursuits. Expect to move and be moved.

     

    RIYL: Beach House, Kate Bush, Lykke Li, Lana del Rey, Grimes

    Listen: Kae Astra – “Medicate”

    Kae Astra – “Medicate”

  • Marika Hackman

    Marika Hackman

    Any Human Friend

    Displaying an unapologetic attitude and a more liberated sound than ever before, Marika Hackman reveals “the one”—the second single from her album “Any Human Friend”. Co-produced by David Wrench (The xx, Frank Ocean) and Hackman herself, layered synthesizers, Marika’s signature new wave guitar fretwork and Blondie-style delivery, make this the new album’s most unexpected musical turn.

     

    The first song written for Any Human Friend, “the one” is “probably the poppiest song I’ve ever written” she says. “ I loved the idea of inhabiting this ridiculous arrogant rock star character who has totally fucked their career by writing too many sad songs.” To that end, it features a riot grrrl Greek chorus hurling such insults at her as “You’re such an attention whore!”

     

    Marika Hackman is a ‘Rid of Me’-era PJ Harvey for the inclusive generation: unbounded by musical genre, a preternatural lyricist and tunesmith who isn’t afraid to go there. Hackman’s 2015 debut, “We Slept at Last,” was heralded for being nuanced and atmospheric. She really found her footing with her last release, “I’m Not Your Man,” and its exceptional, swaggering International hit “Boyfriend”, which boasts of seducing away a straight guy’s girlfriend.

     

    “a blistery pop scorcher….’the one’ is strange, absurd and fun. Jagged guitars, webs of clipped harmonies and bright, pop-stained percussion bounce around as Hackman shouts bizarre lyrics into the ether: ‘You’re such an attention whore!'”–PASTE

     

    “‘The One’ sounds like four or five different songs smashed into one, going from glowering sadsack to glitzy confidence with a snap.”—Stereogum

    Listen: Marika Hackman – “blow”

    Marika Hackman – “blow”

  • Kyle Craft & Showboat Honey

    Kyle Craft & Showboat Honey

    Showboat Honey

    Kyle Craft & Showboat Honey’s impending new long player “Showboat Honey” just cracked the Top 5 Albums at SubModern specialty this week thanks to your support! The New Single “Broken Mirror Pose,” is a glammy, ‘70s-style anthem with a soaring chorus, and which is accompanied by a new video shot by the band themselves (below).

     

    “We shot ‘Broken Mirror Pose’ at Moonbase Studios, which is where we tracked the entire record ourselves! This one was 95% DIY, much like the album. I build out a room inside of the main studio and my pal, Bryson Cone, showed me how to edit afterward, letting me take the wheel once I had a little know how.”—Kyle Craft

     

    “Showboat Honey” was recorded and produced by Kyle Craft, Kevin Clark, and Billy Slater at their own Moonbase Studios in Portland over 2018. The album was mixed by Trevor Spencer (Father John Misty) and mastered by April Golden at Golden Mastering.

     

    You can catch Kyle Craft & Showboat Honey on tour starting next month and as he kicks things off with a hometown show in Portland (See Our Tour page and let us know your wants and needs!)!.

    Listen: Kyle Craft & Showboat Honey – “O Lucky Hand”

    Kyle Craft & Showboat Honey – “O Lucky Hand”

  • The S.L.P.

    The S.L.P.

    THE S.L.P.

    The S.L.P. is the latest project by Sergio Lorenzo Pizzorno, the songwriter and creative force behind Kasabian. The instant “Nobody Else” throws his rulebook out the door, for a breezy, memorable, roll-down-the-car-windows exploration that’s perfect piano ballad meets sun-kissed house.

     

    “I’ve been making a new Kasabian album every couple of years since 2004, I have my routines and I have the way I like to work, and I just think I felt I needed a re-set, so that I could approach the next Kasabian album from a different place. It’s so important, that innocence of just exploring and experimenting, when you’ve got that little part of you going ‘can I get away with that?’ When you ask yourself that, you’re probably on the right track, because it means you’re doing something interesting. It’s like the album cover, I’ve got this mad glitter make up on, but it’s spread all my face like you would when you were a kid – it reminds you that playing is important.” –Sergio Lorenzo Pizzorno (S.L.P.)

     

    The thing is, says Sergio Pizzorno, he didn’t intend to make an album like SLP at all. After he finished touring behind 2017’s “For Crying Out Loud” – Kasabian’s fifth number one album in a row – he simply liked the idea of doing a solo record.

     

    He thought that his solo album would sound… well, like you might think a Sergio Pizzorno solo album would sound. He is, after all, famed not only as Kasabian’s chief songwriter, but a man dedicated to pushing esoteric influences – from MF Doom to Bulgarian psychedelia to avant-garde electronica – into the sonic framework of a mainstream, stadium-filling rock band. A solo album, you could reasonably expect, would be a chance for Pizzorno to let his freak flag fly, unencumbered by the need to make music fit to headline festivals and huge gigs.

     

    “To begin with, I thought it was going to be way more experimental and I thought it was going to be way more odd in terms of the length of tracks and what people, even myself would maybe expect: going more into that sci-fi, Krautrock kind of thing,” says Pizzorno. “But what I found happening was that I was listening to a lot of Tyler The Creator and Mac Miller. I was in that world. I sort of got rid of all my synths and guitars and just sort of had phones and laptops and just picked out sounds. And it turned out like it did, and I thought it just felt right. In a way, it’s probably a bit more of a psychedelic move for me to do this than just to make the record I expected.”

     

    In fact, it’s fair to say that SLP isn’t an album that anyone could anticipate: an intriguing, unprecedented split between filmic instrumentals – audibly partly inspired by Roy Budd’s iconic soundtrack to the 1970 British gangster flick Get Carter – and richly melodic songs influenced by hip hop and grime.

     

    “I just liked the idea of that cartoonish sort of thing, you know: ‘meanwhile, in the Batcave…’,” Pizzorno continues. “People see me in a band, they think: that’s what does and that’s what he is, so the idea behind them is that meanwhile, he’s completely someone else, doing this other thing. And in between them, it was just a matter of exploring, turning everything up, just to see where it took me: experimenting with the way I sang, with different rhythms, with things that I’ve always wanted to do.”

    Listen: The S.L.P. – “Nobody Else” (radio edit)

    The S.L.P. – “Nobody Else” (radio edit)

  • The Get Up Kids

    The Get Up Kids

    Problems

    Following up the recent #1 SubModern Specialty Single “Satellite”, The Get Up Kids offer up “The Problem Is Me” from their new album “Problems” (their first in 8 Years!). “The Problem Is Me” is an exploration of embracing your own romantic dysfunction.

     

    Following up TGUK’s triumphant return to SXSW, you can See Our Tour Page for a full itinerary for a set of newly announced upcoming dates (more to come!).

     

    “The song is about a friend’s second divorce and about taking responsibility in a relationship. For me, the song is about self care. Acknowledging personal faults and trying to work on them.”—Matt Pryor/TGUK

     

    “Problems,” The Get Up Kids‘ sixth studio album, was recorded with Grammy award-winning producer Peter Katis, best known for his lasting work with The National and Interpol, and more recently Kurt Vile’s latest. Peter was an old friend of the band’s, dating back to when he was the assistant engineer on “On A Wire” (2002). The band wrote most of these songs during last year’sKicker” EP cycle, building on the band’s newfound mission statement of leaning into your strengths. The result is one of their most inspired albums to date, a true return to form and will go down as one of their finest efforts.

     

    “The track’s punchy and precise, a wave of keys and stumbling momentum.”—Stereogum

     

    “the punchy, punky sound of their classic 1999 album Something To Write Home About but revising it and adding in the maturity that’s inevitable after 20 more years of age and experience.”—Brooklyn Vegan

    Listen: The Get Up Kids – “The Problem Is Me”

    The Get Up Kids – “The Problem Is Me”

  • If Climbing

    If Climbing

    "The Good Parts"

    IF CLIMBING, then what do you do? Tim Williams plans to answer just that with his new project, and which we’re Elated to unveil via the new single “The Good Parts”!

     

    Tim has been around the musical block quite a few times with 6 full-length albums worth of songs credited solely to his name. (3 under Soft Swells, 3 under Tim Williams). From multiple national tours, to packed venues across the pond, Tim has been making a name for his songs that Nylon has called “refreshing” and Stereogum has called “Magical. ”

     

    This all brings us back to IF CLIMBING, the songs of which have been inspired by the Brit-Pop bands he grew up obsessed with, Tim is reaching deeper than ever before, crafting emotive earworms that hook you with every verse, and sink you with every chorus.

    Listen: If Climbing – “The Good Parts”

    If Climbing – “The Good Parts”

  • Walker Lukens

    Walker Lukens

    Adult

    “For better or worse, I tried to make a record about how absurd it has felt to be alive over the past few years, that sounds like how it feels to build a life while the world you were promised changes,” says Walker Lukens, describing the broad premise behind his third album “ADULT”. “I also wanted to make a record that made people dance…so, here ya go.”

     

    Lukens took creative inspiration from work like Bob Dylan’s famously wide-ranging double LP “Blonde on Blonde” as well as Frank Ocean’s “Blonde” while writing and recording “ADULT”. “That, to me, is the trick – making something personal and political that doesn’t try to make sense of itself,” he says.

     

    “I’ve never wanted to be one of those songwriters who compartmentalizes what part of their lives comes out in their songs,” Lukens says. “I wanted to deal with Trump, and Charlottesville, and the ‘Me Too’ movement alongside things like breaking up and falling in love.”

     

    “ADULT” was produced by Jim Eno from Spoon.

     

    Walker Lukens has become well known for embracing contradiction, “blending genres and techniques” (Billboard) into an addictive sound that’s hard to pin down. NPR’s All Songs Considered described him as a “rhythmic sound effect master” who creates “curious, textured music.”

    Listen: Walker Lukens – “We See U”

    Walker Lukens – “We See U”

  • Weyes Blood

    Weyes Blood

    Titanic Rising

    The New Weyes Blood single “Everyday” chronicles the chaos of modern love and dating, short attention spans, restlessness and the continuous crusade (and carnage) to find some kind of all-encompassing soul mate. The lead single comes from her upcoming fourth album and Sub Pop debut “Titanic Rising”the cover was shot in a bedroom submerged fully underwater (zero CGI!).

     

    “Titanic Rising,” written and recorded during the first half of 2018, is the culmination of three albums and many years of touring: stronger chops and ballsier decisions. It’s an achievement in transcendent vocals and levitating arrangements, conversational lyrics and thoughtful commentary on the modern condition of our souls.  Like the Kinks meet WWII (or is it Bob Seger meets Enya?) “Titanic Rising” manages to ride that line between classic songwriting and post-apocalyptic futurism.

     

    Weyes Blood has also scheduled an intergalactic headlining tour starting the spring of in support of the upcoming album, and which she’s dubbed the ’True Love Is Making A Comeback Tour 2019′ (see our Tours page!).

     

    “There are complicated influences mixed in with more relatable nostalgic melodies. In my mind, my music feels so big, a true production. I’m not a huge, popular artist, but I feel like one when I’m in the studio. But it’s never taking away from the music. I’m just making a bigger space for myself.”—Natalie Mering (aka Weyes Blood)

    Listen: Weyes Blood – “Everyday” (radio edit)

    Weyes Blood – “Everyday” (radio edit)